Is Organic Food Better for You (nutrition, fewer pesticides)?

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If you saw the recent press about organic food (MSNBC’s headline: “Organic food no more nutritious than non-organic”), you may be left wondering if conventional is best after all. But,  you’ll want to take a close look at this debate before making up your mind. A recent review of the published research on organic and non-organic foods (including veggies, fruit, meat, poultry, eggs and milk), out of Stanford University and published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, found that organic options may not vary from their conventional counterparts when it comes to nutrition. However, they found consuming organic may lower your exposure to pesticides (though your risk for exceeding allowed government limits, even in conventional foods, is small). E coli contamination risk didn’t differ between organic or conventional chicken and bacterial contamination of chicken and pork was common regardless of farming method (organic or conventional). However, they found the risk of picking up antibiotic-resistant bacteria in your pork or chicken was higher if you chose the conventional kind vs. organic. And finally, some studies didn’t define the criteria they used to determine what foods qualified as organic (strange! – check this link for more about organic labeling).

Two more things to keep in mind. “Natural” does not mean organic. And, organic does not always mean pesticide and chemical free. It means the food is free from synthetic pesticides and fertilizers. Organic farmers can use pesticides derived from natural sources. If you really want to become an informed consumer, you’ll go straight to the source on organic farming. And if you want to know what’s in your food, buy local and ask the farmer what they use to keep the pests away or better yet, get out there and start planting your own garden.

Here’s my bottom line on organics:

  • It’s a personal choice
  • Eat more fruits and vegetables, regardless of whether or not they are organic
  • Wash your produce regardless of whether it is organic or conventional (do you know how many unclean hands may have touched that piece of fruit?)
  • If it comes down to price, choose better quality food overall – weigh the nutrition value of the food, your feelings on pesticides and how far you need to stretch your food dollar

If you have a strong opinion on this subject, leave a comment and let me know!

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