How Dieting Wrecked your Self Esteem and Made you Overweight

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This article is for all serial dieters. If you’ve been dieting on and off for years yet never achieved or maintained your “goal” weight, you’ve been handcuffed to the multi-billion dollar diet industry. I’m here to tell you why you need to break free and how to do it.

Why You Need to Break Free From Dieting

If you are a perpetual dieter, in search of the latest magic weight loss diet or pill, you may be doing more harm than good.

Dieting Slows Your Metabolism
Losing weight leads to a drop in the amount of calories you burn each day so you need to cut your calories even more after you lose the weight to maintain your new weight. This happens even if you preserve muscle (each pound of muscle burns about four more calories per day then a pound of fat) (9). This is termed metabolic adaptation and the reasons for it aren’t entirely clear though the decrease in metabolism is correlated with how many calories you cut and changes in the hormone leptin. Leptin is a hormone secreted by fat cells; it helps regulate body weight and energy balance (7, 8).

The more you cut calories the more your metabolism will drop.

Rapid and massive weight loss seems to lead to the greatest drop in metabolic rate.

Though this happens, it doesn’t mean you shouldn’t lose weight if needed for health reasons. However, the “Oprah” cycle of repetitive low calorie dieting followed by weight regain needs to stop.

Diets Over Promise and Under Deliver
Diets promise you’ll get ripped in no time. Research tells us you won’t lose all of the weight you expect to lose (1). And that’s ok. However, unrealistic expectations are a problem because they make you want to ditch the diet or worse, binge eat because you are pissed off that you’ve been lied to.

Reign in your expectations with these validated weight loss calculators:

Pennington Biomedical Research Center Weight Loss Calculator

USDA SuperTracker

Your Life Won’t Magically Change
Dieting tells you your entire life will get better once you lose 10 lbs. Sure, you might need to hem a few pairs of pants and your self esteem may improve a bit. However, you won’t turn into a GQ or Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition cover model. Your boss will treat you the same, your relationships won’t magically improve and everything else in your life might appear to be static if you are waiting for fireworks.

There are many times I run into people who want to lose weight and as I start asking questions and digging I realize they are attempting to control their weight and hyper control their food intake because there is something in their life that is out of control. They are transferring the focus on their body, food and exercise to calm their brain down and decrease anxiety about parts of their life that are raveling out of control.

Don’t use dieting as an excuse to avoid major life issues.

Dieting Tells You “You’re Not Okay”
Many popular diets, pills and programs marketed through airbrushed ads tell you one thing “there is something is wrong with you and this book, program or pill can help you fix it.” They are preying on your vulnerable self-esteem. Taking the bait is like jumping into a dark and depressing pit over and over, attempting to crawl out, losing your grip and getting kicked right back down. Every time you gain a little weight back or judge yourself based on the bathroom scale you’ll feel dejected.

“Where there is perfectionism there is always shame (guilt, regret, sadness),” Brene Brown.

Consistently feeding your mind with a diet of “I’m not good enough” is no way to live. Treat yourself with some respect.

“I’m not good enough” is also a mental roadblock to achieving your goals. One day you’ll have a tough day, come home and say “F this. I’m fat, I might as well eat this whole package of Milky Ways.” Next thing you know you feel like a failure and fall into the ultimate Feedback Loop from Hell. “Why can’t I stick with a diet? I suck.” Once stuck in this mindset, it’s hard to recognize there could be something wrong with the diet itself and the promises (lies) you’ve been told if you just follow it.

I’m here to say you are okay.

Letting Go of the Diet Crutch

If you’ve been dieting on and off for years, recognize that you will have some anxiety in letting go. That’s okay. There are steps you can take to combat anxiety over time and still achieve good health.

What if You Want to / Need to Lose Weight?
If you need lose weight for health reasons, yet you’ve dieted over and over in the past, without reaching your goal, it is time to do something different. Here are steps you can take to a healthier weight and life without dieting:

• Get Support – research shows people who have support are more likely to take weight off and less likely to gain it back.

• Keep in mind moderate weight loss can make a tremendous difference in health. Even small amounts of weight loss can lower blood fats (triglycerides), cholesterol, blood sugar, risk for diabetes and other chronic diseases.

• Start with exercise while focusing on the immediate benefits of exercise – improved mood, improved memory, greater self esteem.

• Be proud of small “wins.” If you haven’t exercised since recess in elementary school, it isn’t necessary to jump right into high intensity interval training three days per week. Start small and be proud of your changes along the way. Even 5 to 10 minutes of exercise each day plus one diet change will help build healthy long-term habits.

• Realize that nobody is looking at you in your bathing suit on the beach and judging your body. We are the harshest critics of ourselves. Someday you will look back and regret not wearing that bathing suit and enjoying the water.

• Go on a diet from the media. Constantly viewing “ideal” body images reduces body satisfaction. In other words, the more you look at popular magazines with airbrushed pictures the worse you will feel about yourself (2, 3, 4). This is true for both men and women.

• Find a physical trait you love and focus on it daily. You will feel better about your body when you focus on the parts of your body you like the best. Conversely, focusing on the parts of your body you do not like will increase body dissatisfaction (5).

• Check out the Happiness Trap – an empowering self-help book based on behavioral psychology.

Follow This Approach
There are two approaches to not dieting and both go hand-in-hand. The first one is Intuitive Eating. Intuitive eating breaks the dieting cycle and teaches you how to feed your body based on hunger and satiety cues. There are number of intuitive eating counselors who can help you with this.

The second approach is Body Kindness. This book is about creating a happier and healthier life. The focus is on spiraling up, the idea that your mindset and mood influences your choices and vice versa to help you stay more positive, optimistic and open to bring the best you to the world — and it has nothing to do with what you weigh. Author Rebecca Scritchfield, RDN, a former chronic dieter who broke free from the cyle of dieting and emotional overeating, believes dieting creates a downward spiral because it enhances your negative emotions. Body Kindness is based on three pillars: Love Connect Care. Make choices from a place of love, connect to your body to find out what you really need, and fully commit to your self-care plans.

I use diets, when warranted, and prescribed the right way for those who are not perpetual dieters. I do not recommend them for people who have gone on and off them for years and have a poor body image. I will never forget the time I counseled a woman in her 30s who had been on and off Weight Watchers since she was a pre-teen. She said, “it works for me.” And she was surprised at my response “no, it hasn’t worked for you because if it did you wouldn’t be sitting in front of me today.” She said she was ashamed about how she looked. My response, “let’s work on that. It’s time to let go, break free, give up emotional overeating and body shame.” That’s no way to live.

References

1 Dhurandhar EJ et al. Predicting adult weight change in the real world: a systematic review and meta-analysis accounting for compensatory changes in energy intake or expenditure. Int J Obes (Lond) 2015;39(8):1181-7.

2 Morry MM, Staska SL. Magazine exposure: Internalization, self-objectification, eating attitudes, and body satisfaction in male and female university students. Can J Behav 2001; 33: 269–279

3 Grabe S, Ward LM, Hyde JS. The role of the media in body image concerns among women: a meta-analysis of experimental and correlational studies.
Psychol Bull 2008;134(3):460-76.

4 Agliata D, Tantleff-Dunn S (2004) The impact of media exposure on males’ body image. J Soc Clin Psychol 23: 7–22

5 Smeets E, Jansen A, Roefs A. Bias for the (un)attractive self: on the role of attention in causing body (dis)satisfaction. Health Psychol 2011;30(3):360-7.

6 Lowe MR et al. Multiple types of dieting prospectively predict weight gain during the freshman year of college. Appetite 2006;47(1):83-90.

7 Zhou Y and Rui L. Leptin signaling and leptin resistance. Front Med 7: 207-222, 2013.

8 Knuth ND, Johannsen DL, Tamboli RA, Marks-Shulman PA, Huizenga R, Chen KY, Abumrad NN, Ravussin E, and Hall KD. Metabolic adaptation following massive weight loss is related to the degree of energy imbalance and changes in circulating leptin. Obesity (Silver Spring) 22: 2563-2569, 2014.

9 Johannsen DL, Knuth ND, Huizenga R, Rood JC, Ravussin E, and Hall KD. Metabolic slowing with massive weight loss despite preservation of fat-free mass. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2012; 97: 2489-2496.

Ketogenic Diets: Fat-Filled Lies Won’t Make You Slim (or a Better Athlete)

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How do you turn your body into a fat burning machine, run faster than Usain Bolt, recover from exercise immediately and wake up each day bursting with energy? According to some people, the ketogenic diet is your answer (learn the basics of this diet here). This high-fat, moderate protein diet that is practically void of carbohydrates forces your body to use fat for energy. LeBron James supposedly tried it and offensive lineman decided to give it a shot after an ex-NFL center and O-line coach LeCharles Bentley recommended it. However, the offensive lineman and LeBron weren’t actually following a ketogenic diet. Though these athletes didn’t really know what they were following (no worries LeCharles, I’m sure your nutrition advice is on par with me coaching the O-line), people who actually follow it swear by it. Could this be an unconventional path to weight loss and better health? Unfortunately, the ketogenic diet craze has been fattened with misinformation.

Here is what I am covering in this post:

  • Eat Fat, Lose Fat? Does the ketogenic diet make you lose weight?
  • How does this diet impact muscle?
  • The ketogenic diet and athletic performance.
  • The issue with ketogenic research studies.

I am not covering “training low” or low carbohydrate  / non-ketogenic diets in this article.

Eat Fat, Lose Fat?

During the first several days on a ketogenic diet your weight will take a nosedive. Carbohydrate is stored in the form of glycogen in liver and muscle. Each gram of carbohydrate is stored with 3 – 4 grams of water. Decrease your carbohydrate intake, use glycogen and you’ll lose water weight very quickly. Weight loss, even if from water, can motivate people driven by the number on the scale. Given that adherence is the number one predictor of weight loss when on a diet, we can’t discount psychological effect of the number on the scale going down.

What happens if you stay on the diet? A group of NIH researchers admitted seventeen overweight or obese men to a metabolic ward and placed them on a high carbohydrate baseline diet for four weeks followed by four weeks on an isocaloric ketogenic diet (this diet contained the same amount of calories as the high carbohydrate baseline diet). The men lost weight and body fat on both diets. The ketogenic diet did not lead to greater fat loss as compared to the high carbohydrate diet and in fact body fat loss slowed during the ketogenic diet and subjects lost muscle (1). Time to chuck the “carbohydrates make you fat” books in the recycling bin.

What about other studies showing ketogenic diets help athletes lose body fat and maintain performance? These studies were not actually using a ketogenic diet protocol but instead were high fat, high protein, low carbohydrate diets. Also, none of the studies measured if the study subjects were actually in nutritional ketosis (2, 3, 4).  See the section on The Issue with Ketogenic Research Studies for more information on this topic.

Ketogenic diet and weight

Regardless of the studies indicating the ketogenic diet will not lead to greater weight loss and could result in a decrease in muscle mass, I know I would lose weight on it only because I’d get sick of eating. If faced with eating a fatty steak with melted butter on top for dinner followed by spoonfuls of oil for dessert, I’d rather not eat.

Muscle Up with the Ketogenic Diet?

The ketogenic diet isn’t high enough in protein for maximal muscle gains. Using the lower end of fat intake on a classic ketogenic diet (80% of calories), one could consume 15% of calories from protein (112 grams) on a 3,000-calorie diet. Protein requirements are at least 1.2 – 1.8 grams of protein per kilogram bodyweight (or 0.55 – 0.82 grams per lb. bodyweight) per day if training and eating a diet with enough calories to maintain weight. Protein needs go up if you are cutting calories to spare the breakdown of muscle tissue when dieting. On this diet, 112 grams of protein equals just under 1.3 grams of protein per kg bodyweight for a 200 lb. person and even less for anyone who weighs more.

In addition to inadequate protein intake, “the ketogenic diet reduces many of the signaling molecules involved in muscle hypertrophy (growth),” states Dr. Antonio Paoli, M.D., B.Sc., Associate Professor and Vice Dean of the School of Human Movement Sciences, University of Padova. Without getting too technical, even with sufficient calorie intake, the ketogenic diet suppresses the IGF-1 / AKT / mTOR pathway (5). Using ketones for energy slows muscle breakdown. However it doesn’t stop this process (5).

The Ketogenic Diet and Athletic Performance

Once fully adapted to a ketogenic diet, athletes can supposedly rely on a seemingly endless supply of body fat for energy. No need for carbohydrate gels, beans, gummies and sports drinks every 15-30 minutes during long runs, rides or triathlons to sustain energy levels. Fewer calories consumed may make it easier for some people to stay within their total daily calorie needs (though if you are training that much staying within your calorie requirements shouldn’t be difficult).

Trading carbs for fat seems like a huge benefit for athletes, particularly endurance athletes who train and compete for several hours at a time (6). In addition to utilizing body fat, fat actually produces more energy (ATP) (5). However, fat is a slow source of fuel (see graphic below), the human body cannot access it quickly enough to sustain high-intensity exercise and therefore, this diet is really only (potentially) applicable to ultra-runners and triathletes competing at a relatively moderate to slow pace.

In a ketogenic diet study examining athletic endurance, researchers had subjects cycle at a snails pace (equivalent to a heart rate of about 120 beats per minute for anyone 20-30 years old or 115 for a 40 year old) until they became exhausted before and after 4-weeks on a ketogenic diet. There were no differences in the amount of time they were able to cycle before getting tired prior to or after the four-week ketogenic diet (7). In studies examining high fat diets (not ketogenic and ketones weren’t measured) and endurance performance, study subjects relied on more fat as opposed to carbohydrate during low intensity exercise, yet there was no clear performance advantage on the higher fat diet (8). A recently published study examined 20 elite ultra-marathoners and Ironman distance triathletes. Some were habitually consuming a traditional high carbohydrate diet while the other group was following a ketogenic diet (slightly adjusted macronutrient ratios yet they were in ketosis as measured by blood ketone levels). As expected, those following a higher fat diet used a greater percentage of fat for energy while the higher carbohydrate diet group used more carbohydrate for energy during a 180 minute submaximal running test (I’d call that leisure running intensity). There was no difference in calories burned over the course of the run. Both groups had the same level of perceived exertion and there was no test to determine performance differences between groups (9).

If there’s no performance benefit and we know carbohydrates work, why follow this diet? If your primary goal is weight loss, it doesn’t matter if you use more fat than carbohydrate while exercising (SN: can we please stop talking about the fat burning zone) as long as you’re burning more total calories over the course of the day. Plus, in the interest of (if you are not an ultra endurance athlete) jack up the intensity and burn as many calories in a short period of time as possible. Unfortunately, a ketogenic diet won’t help you do that – when relying on fat for fuel, the intensity of your exercise will drop – the body simply can’t access fat (a slow source of energy) quickly enough to sustain high-intensity exercise. Instead, carbohydrates are necessary for high intensity activity.
ketogenic diet and sports

The Issue with Ketogenic Research Studies

Here’s the issue with many ketogenic research studies and media reports based on them: in most cases, the study subjects were not actually following a ketogenic diet – they were following a higher fat, high-protein low carbohydrate diet (10, 11, 12). Each person’s carbohydrate and protein limits needed to stay in ketosis vary and therefore, measuring ketones through blood or urine is the only definitive way to determine if you are in ketosis. Complicating matters more, low carbohydrate diets (including ketogenic diets) lead to a substantial drop in carbohydrate content, and associated water stored with it, in muscle. This change overestimates the drop in lean body mass as measured by DEXA.

ketogenic and low carbohydrate diets

There are no modifications, higher protein intakes or “on again, off again” (where you go on it one day and off it the next) to this diet. You must be in a state of nutritional ketosis or you will need to decrease carbohydrate and protein intake even further to get into nutritional ketosis and rely on ketones for energy.

Is There Any Benefit?

Ketogenic diets help decrease incidence and severity of seizures in epileptic patients (this is what the diet is intended for). Also, ketogenic diets may be beneficial when implemented soon after a traumatic brain injury (including concussion) (13). In addition, scientists are examining if this diet is beneficial for diseases that affect the brain such as Alzheimer’s.

If you want to lose weight, the ketogenic diet is not superior to a reduced calorie diet. Also, unless you are an ultra endurance athlete who just loves dietary fat, hates eating at social occasions and can put up with the potential side effects from this diet it isn’t for you.
Now where is the O-line? I’ve got some coaching to do…

References

1 Hall KD, Chen KY, Guo J, Lam YY, Leibel RL, Mayer LE, Reitman ML, Rosenbaum M, Smith SR, Walsh BT, Ravussin E. Energy expenditure and body composition changes after an isocaloric ketogenic diet in overweight and obese men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Jul 6. [Epub ahead of print]

2 Zajac A, Poprzecki S, Maszczyk A, Czuba M, Michalczyk M, Zydek G. The effects of a ketogenic diet on exercise metabolism and physical performance in off-road cyclists. Nutrients 2014;6(7):2493-508.

3 Rhyu HS, Cho SY. The effect of weight loss by ketogenic diet on the body composition, performance-related physical fitness factors and cytokines of Taekwondo athletes. J Exerc Rehabil 2014;10(5):326-31.

4 Paoli A, Grimaldi K, D’Agostino D et al. Ketogenic diet does not affect strength performance in elite artistic gymnasts. JISSN 2012;9:34.

5 Paoli A, Bianco A, Grimaldi KA. The ketogenic diet and sport: a possible marriage? Ex Sports Sci Reviews 2015.

6 Volek J, Noakes T, Phinney SD. Rethinking fat as a fuel for endurance exercise. Eur J Sport Sci 2014;2:1-8.

7 Phinney SD, Bistrian BR, Evans WJ, Gervino E, Blackburn GL. The human metabolic response to chronic ketosis without caloric restriction: preservation of submaximal exercise capability with reduced carbohydrate oxidation. Metabolism 1983;32(8):769-76.

8 Burke LM, Kiens B. “Fat adaptation” for athletic performance: the nail in the coffin? J Appl Physiol 2006;100(1):7-8.

9 Volek J, Freidenreich DJ, Saenz C, Kunces LJ, Creighton BC, Bartley JM, Davitt pm, Munoz CX, Anderson JM, Maresh CM, Lee EC, Schuenke MD, Aerni G, Kraemer WJ, Phinney SD. Metabolic characteristics of keto-adapted ultra-endurance runners. Metab Clin Exp 2016;65(3):100-110.

10 Tinsley GM, Willoughby DS. Fat-Free mass changes during ketogenic diets and the potential role of resistance training. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2015 Aug 12. [Epub ahead of print]2 Rouillier MA, Riel D, Brazeau AS, St. Pierre DH, Karelis AD. Effect of an Acute High Carbohydrate Diet on Body Composition Using DXA in Young Men. Ann Nutr Metab 2015;66:233-236

11  Paoli A. The ketogenic diet and sport: a possible marriage? Ex Sci Sports Sciences Rev 2015;43(3):153-62.

12  Johnstone AM, Horgan GW, Murison SD, Bremner DM, Lobley GE. Effects of a high-protein ketogenic diet on hunger, appetite, and weight loss in obese men feeding ad libitum. Am Society Clin Nutr 2008;87(1):44-55.

13 Nutrition and Traumatic Brain Injury: Improving Acute and Subacute Health Outcomes in Military Personnel (2011). The National Academies Press, Institute of Medicine. Washington DC. 2011 http://www.nap.edu/read/13121/chapter/15

 

Ghoulishly Great Halloween Ideas

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If you’re throwing a Halloween party this year, scare your guests with spooky decorations and themed dishes instead of bottomless bowls of high-calorie candy. Here are the party treats that won’t play tricks on your waistline that I shared on WCNC’s Charlotte Today:

Spooky Appetizers

Starting off, every Halloween party needs a witch and you’ll know she’s flying nearby if you see these easy-to-assemble pretzel cheese broomsticks from Mom Foodie.

Witches' brooms

Bats and witches naturally go together and I loved this recipe from Tastefully Simple for bats made out of deviled eggs. I used a lower fat mayo because it contains fewer calories and smoked paprika because adds so much flavor!

Deviled egg Bats

I used Green Mountain Farms cream cheese (four times the protein compared to regular cream cheese plus live and active cultures – i.e. probiotics) and  good-quality shredded cheddar cheese to make Beth of Hungry Happenings cute Cheddar Monsterscheddar monsters

After learning what was in a hot dog when I was a teenager (scrap meat) I said “no thank you.” Now you can find newer and better hot dogs including the uncured turkey hot dogs I used to make mummy dogs.

A Better Fall Beverage

Fall means apple cider and you can either make your own (and make it low-calorie with a sugar substitute) or buy it (I recommend getting it from an apple farm). If you make yourself be sure to add cinnamon and allspice.  In addition to adding flavor, like apples, both also add antioxidants.

Desserts that will DelightHalloween Dess

Strawberry ghosts are so easy to make that very young children can help. Melt a white chocolate for candy decorations (some brands of white chocolate may not melt or dry as well) and dip washed and throughly dried strawberries in the chocolate while letting the rest of chocolate flow off the strawberry. Use mini chocolate chips for eyes. Melt chocolate chips and pour in a <Wilton Candy Eyeballs
. Cut a small bit off the tip of the bag so the icing can flow through. Now, make your mouth.

Follow the package directions for rice krispie treats (I substituted a light butter spread with no hydrogenated oils for  butter) to Rice Krispie pumpkins. Once your rice krispie treats are made, turn off the heat and immediately add a tiny bit of orange dye and mix it throughout the rice krispies (I used food gloves that I found in Wal-mart so my hands wouldn’t turn orange). Next, shape your rice krispie batter into pumpkins. Let these cool off at room temperature for at least an hour. Instead of using  candy for the stem, I cut a whole-grain breakfast bar into stems for each pumpkin. Next I placed a small bit of green icing from a green icing tube (Betty Crocker and Wilton make these. Find the tips that go with these particular brands right next to the icing and buy one with a leaf tip.) onto the top of the pumpkin and then set my breakfast bar stem into the pumpkin. After this I piped a few leaves around the stem of the pumpkin.

Spider Cookies
A Spicy Perspective had the cutest spider cookies that I found on Pinterest. Click here for the recipe. I substituted one third of the flour for whole wheat flour and may work with this recipe a little more in the future. You can also lower the sugar content of the cookies (or any baked goods) by substituting all natural Swerve Sweetener for most or all of the sugar. As my colleague Molly Kimball, RD, CSSD, an expert at working with Swerve says “many recipes call for so MUCH sugar” and you can easily reduce the amount in savory dishes (and the amount of Swerve if you use it) but, in baked good sugar provides “bulk” which makes sugar reduction a little tricky. Instead of using a truffle in the middle, I made protein balls with peanut flour (high protein and a good or excellent source of several vitamins and minerals as well as fiber) for the body of the spider.

Protein balls:

Ingredients
1 cup quick oats
1/2 cup honey
1 cup peanut butter
1/2 to 1 cup peanut flour or chocolate peanut flour (find this right next to peanut butter in the grocery store or on amazon – Jif Regular and Chocolate Peanut Powder).

Directions
Mix the oats, honey and peanut butter in a mixer (I use the heavy duty KitchenAid). Next add peanut flour in small amounts until balls can be shaped but are not too dry (all protein is drying, it sucks the moisture out and the amount of flour you use depends a little on the texture of the peanut butter). Once your mix is easy to handle and shape in balls, shape small balls for the spider’s body. Dip each body into melted chocolate melts and let the excess drain off. Quickly add the eyes (Wilton Candy Eyeballs) before the chocolate dries. Next, place the chocolate dipped protein ball onto the head of the cookie. Next, using your melted chocolate in an icing bag (cake decorating bag), pipe the lines of the spider on the cookie.

Oftentimes the excitement of Halloween isn’t the candy, which is available all year long in different packaging but instead, the decorations. So, if you are throwing a party for kids or adults, decorate each room, use Halloween themed napkins, cups and plates and serve healthier food and drink options that incorporate the Halloween spirit. Get your guests up and moving by setting out fun games they can participate in – treasure hunts and bean bag tosses. Plus you can keep kids active by setting out sidewalk chalk, pumpkin decorating kits and other craft ideas.

Swerve is an al natural sweetener that is made from erythritol (erythritol is naturally found in many fruits and vegetables) and oligosaccharides. Oligosaccharides are a type of prebiotic fiber (prebiotic fiber stimulates the  growth of healthy bacteria in your gut) that has a naturally sweet taste.

Keeping the weight off: is diet the only strategy?

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By Gisselle Marie Rosa

You’ve done everything right by eating sweets less often, cutting down on drinks with added sugar, and eating more fruits and vegetables. But what happens when it becomes harder to shed those last five or ten pounds? What if you just want to stay at a healthy weight? Well, get moving!

Physical activity is a fabulous way to boost metabolism (calories burned) and help you reach your health goals. Studies show exercise can help you lose more weight than dieting alone. Plus resistance exercise (weight lifting for instance) will help you maintain or even build muscle mass when dieting. This is important because we lose fat, muscle and a tiny bit of bone when dieting. Add resistance exercise to your routine and you’ll help protect muscle tissue while losing a greater portion of fat. Unfortunately, only 49.6% of Americans are meeting the Physical Activity Guidelines, which indicate that adults should do at least 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity, like brisk walking or cycling.

Getting 150 minutes of exercise a week may seem like a lot, but, when you space it out throughout the week, it is definitely doable. For instance, if you spend 30 minutes a day being active, you can reach 150 minutes in just 5 days. Also, studies show that exercising in 10 minute increments throughout the day is just as beneficial as spending the full 30 minutes exercising. This is perfect for individuals who work all day and for busy moms or dads who just can’t seem to be able to spend that much time exercising.

Exercise is also amazing because it can help you maintain your goal. It also lowers your risk for diseases such as Type 2 Diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and even depression.

So what’s the best way to start adding physical activity to your routine? Find something that you love to do! If you choose an activity you enjoy, you are more likely to stick with it. There are many ways you can be physically active without feeling stuck using a treadmill at the gym. Many gyms offer a variety of fitness classes like dance, yoga, kickboxing, and trampoline jumping. If a gym is not your scene, consider taking a brisk walk or biking outside and getting some fresh air.

Wherever your interests lie, being physically active is a great way to de-stress, achieve a healthy weight, and have fun.

References

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Facts about Physical Activity. Version current 20 May 2014. Internet: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/exercise.htm.

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. How Much Physical Activity do Adults Need? Version current: 3 March 2014. http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/guidelines/adults.html

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Physical Activity and Health. Version current: 16 February 2011. http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/health/index.html

Heart Healthy Chocolate Muffins

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Just a few weeks ago I had an athlete ask me if he should start eating chocolate for better recovery. If you’ve read the media reports you have probably heard a number of potentially great things about chocolate:

Despite the fact that chocolate may actually be good for us, not all chocolate is created equally. Chocolate candy, for instance, oftentimes has added sugar and fat (and sometimes that horrific manmade trans fat in the form of partially hydrogenated oil).

So, if you want to get the most out of your cocoa or chocolate, choose non alkalized or lightly alkalized cocoa (alkalized is also called “dutched”) or dark chocolate (not milk chocolate – milk binds to chocolate’s antioxidants making them unavailable).

For more information about the health benefits of chocolate, click here. For information about how the process of alkalization affects the antioxidants in chocolate, click here.

I added peanut flour to this recipe for a little more protein. If you want an additional chocolate boost – add chocolate chips or chunks! I always recommend tasting something as you cook or bake it so use pasteurized egg substitute in any recipe you want to taste before it goes in the oven!

Chocolate Muffins

  • 1/2 cup oil
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup peanut flour
  • 3/4 cup all purpose flour
  • 2/3 cup unsweetened non alkalized cocoa
  • 1 ¼ cups packed light brown sugar
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp salt
  1. Preheat oven to 375°F and line muffin pan with muffin cups or spray.
  2. Whisk together the butter, eggs, yogurt, and vanilla extract.
  3. In another bowl whisk together both types of flour, cocoa powder, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.
  4. Very gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and fill muffin tins ½ – 2/3 full.
  5. Bake for 20 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean.
  6. Let cool on wire rack immediately after the muffins come out of the oven.
If you are looking for peanut flour, you can find it online (Byrd Mill: www.byrdmill.com) in addition to Harvey’s grocery stores in South Carolina, North Carolina and Georgia; and Whole Foods in Virginia under the brand Montebello Kitchens and at www.montebellokitchens.com. That last one contains a pre-biotic – a unique and very cool option, especially for people dealing with gut issues and those who just want to  promote healthy gut bacteria.