Coffee – a Cup of Cancer?

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Brace yourself. Thanks to a court in California, your cup of coffee may soon come with a cancer warning. The potentially cancer-causing culprit in coffee is acrylamide. Though the court decision is not final yet, the news articles are both confusing and misleading. Acrylamide is far from unique to coffee. Plus, there are no convincing research studies that clearly show acrylamide causes cancer in humans.

Acrylamide and Cancer

The Food and Drug Administration considers acrylamide a health concern. The World Health Organization says acrylamide has the potential to cause cancer to humans. This does not mean it will cause cancer. Cancer is complex. Plus, in research studies, animals were given 1,000 to 10,000 times more acrylamide than the average person consumes each day! No studies to date show a clear increased risk of cancer in humans due to acrylamide. However, these studies have many limits including self-reported food intake (relying on people to remember how often they eat certain foods). According to the American Cancer Society, more studies are needed to evaluate how this compound is formed, how to decrease it and determine potential health risks.

Making matters more confusing, every person metabolizes acrylamide differently. Plus, animals and humans differ as well.

Sources of Acrylamide in Our Diet

Acrylamide forms during high heat cooking including frying, roasting and baking. Boiling and steaming do not typically form acrylamide. Grains and coffee are the foods & beverages that contain higher amounts of this compound. Dairy, meat and fish aren’t a concern. French fries and potato chips are the foods with the highest levels of acrylamide. From chip to chip or French fry to French fry the amount varies depending on how the food is cooked.

Blue Mesa Grill Sweet potato chips contain 16 times the amount of acrylamide as a single cup of Maxwell House original signature blend. Enjoy Rippin’ Good Ginger snap cookies and you’ll consume almost 4 times the amount of acrylamide compared to that cup of coffee from Maxwell House. Though cold brewing sounds like a solution, roasting coffee beans leads to acrylamide, not brewing at home. Smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke are also routes to acrylamide intake. People who work in certain industries including construction, oil drilling, textiles, cosmetics food processing, mining, plastics and more may also be exposed to this compound.

For a list of acrylamide levels is in various foods click here.

Decreasing Your Exposure

Though there are a lot of unknowns and no studies to date that clearly indicate acrylamide contributes to or causes cancer, it makes sense to decrease exposure when possible and when it doing so doesn’t interfere with your enjoyment of food. Here’s how:

  • Eat a diet that emphasizes vegetables, fruits, lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs, nuts and dairy.
  • Quit smoking and avoid secondhand smoke.
    Limit fried foods.
  • Boil or steam instead of baking and frying when possible.
  • Soak potato slices in water for 15 to 30 minutes (drain, blot dry with a paper towel) before baking them.
  • Cook your baked goods for a shorter period of time. Don’t burn your bread in the toaster, pull it out when it is light brown. Also, don’t char foods on the grill.

Learn more about other compounds formed during high heat cooking by clicking here.

References:
href=”http://monographs.iarc.fr/ENG/Classification/”>http://monographs.iarc.fr/ENG/Classification/
FDA CFSAN
American Cancer Society
Curr Drug Metab. 2016;17(4):317-26.

Get Your Kids Cooking & Win Cabot Cheese & a Subscription to ChopChop Magazine

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cabot give away

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Find out how you can end food struggles with your child and enter to win $25 of Cabot cheese and a subscription to ChopChop Magazine (learn more about both below)!

Help! My Child only Eats French Fries & Chicken Nuggets!

Parents often tell me say their kids will only eat French fries and chicken nuggets. Or, their children stare at their plate because they don’t like what you served (hello! that was me!). If your child is a picky eater, I have 3 tips that will help eliminate food struggles and get your children on the path to healthy eating.

Take Your Kids Food Shopping

When we were kids my father did all of the food shopping in our family. And, he often took all three of us with him. We became very familiar with the grocery store and different types of foods within each section. As a parent, get your child involved by taking them to the grocery store or farmers market and let them be active participants. Give your children the power of choice. For instance, in the produce isle, let them choose which new fruit they want packed in their school lunch. Also, if you have a little one who is fearful of new foods, have them try a familiar food in a different form. So for instance, in the pasta isle, encourage them to pick different shapes of pasta, whole grain pasta, higher protein pasta, orzo or rice pilaf. This is a very non-threatening way to open their minds to new foods.

Teach Basic Nutrition

Teach easy nutrition facts in relatable terms. So for instance, if your 4 year old loves to color but hates most veggies you put on the table, get a coloring book about farming. ChopChop Magazine, endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics, is my go-to for fun cooking. ChopChop Magazine includes great tasting, budget conscious, easy to prepare recipes, fun food facts and pages full of beautiful pictures that will get kids interested in nutrition and cooking. ChopChop Magazine is perfect for children ages 5 to 12 and anyone new to cooking.

ChopChop

Let Them Play With Their Food

Encourage your child’s creativity during cooking and food preparation by letting them play with their food. Give them a few choices on how to prepare the food and what to combine it with. Do they want to eat their carrots raw, steamed, or in a casserole? Also,  let them make fun shapes out of their food (I love doing this!).
Kids will love making Cabot Cheddar mice from crackers, Cabot Cheddar Cheese, a cut strawberry,  mini chocolate chips, and pretzel sticks.

Cabot cheddar mice

 

Get excited about nutritious food. Kids will model your healthy eating behaviors but and pick up on your perception of different foods. Don’t apologize or say things like “you’ll have to eat your peas if you want dessert” because then your little one will relate peas with something that they shouldn’t enjoy eating.

Win a 1-year subscription to ChopChop Magazine AND a $25 Cabot Cheese gift box!

Cabot Cooperative Creamery  is a family farmer owned Creamery  that produces world-class cheddar cheese,  dips, sour cream, Greek yogurt, cream cheese, and butter.

ChopChopKids is an innovative non-profit organization whose mission is to inspire and teach kids to cook healthy food with their families. They believe that cooking and eating together as a family is a vital step in resolving the obesity and hunger epidemics. ChopChop Magazine reaches more than 2 million families each year and is endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics, was named publication of the year by the James Beard Foundation, and is a two-time winner of the Parent’s Choice Award.

They have a free ChopChop Cooking club – their national healthy cooking campaign to invite every family to join and pledge to cook dinner together once a month for 6 months.

Check out their websites:
www.chopchopmag.org
www.ChopChopCookingClub.org

To enter this contest for your chance to win, tweet your favorite way to get your kids cooking with Cabot Cheddar & tag @cabotcheese & @chopchopmagazine in your tweet. Or, “Like” ChopChop Magazine & Cabot Cooperative Creamery on Facebook and comment on both Facebook pages with your favorite way to  get kids cooking with Cabot Cheddar cheese. All entries will be blinded and the winner chosen by a 13 year old chef at 4 pm today (Oct. 30th).

The Great Gluten Debate

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Get two passionate Italian scientists in the room and you are in for a show. If the nitty gritty details about mucosal villous atrophy sound about as exciting as reading a manual on how to fix your vacuum cleaner, at least you’ll be entertained by the Cramer Mad Money Style voice inflections, common pop culture references and overly expressive hands gestures that put a non-verbal exclamation point on every sentence!!! The Great Gluten Debate Face-off between two world renown scientists, Stefano Guandalini, MD  from the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center and Alessio Fasano, MD from the University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research did not disappoint.

Fasano said two things must be present for you to have celiac disease, an autoimmune digestive disease: you have the gene and you consume the trigger (gluten). Celiac disease is under diagnosed – there are many people who have it yet they have no idea that they have celiac disease. Fasano said 3 million people likely have celiac disease but less than 5% have been diagnosed. Some of the symptoms he spouted off at warp speed include:

  • anemia and fatigue – by far the most common symptoms in adults
  • delayed puberty
  • dermatitis herpetiformis
  • short stature
  • dental enamel hypoplasia

A comprehensive list of Celiac disease symptoms is available here.

Initial screening tests often include a celiac panel including a test for Immunoglobulin A, which is 90-98% sensitive and 94-97% specific for celiac disease (sensitivity means this test returns an accurate result in about 90-98% of patients screened).

Gluten is in all forms of wheat including spelt, kamut, malt, couscous, bulgar, triticale, einkorn and faro while rye and barley are related grains. Think of gluten like a long beaded necklace. According to Dr. Fasano, some of the beads (gliadin) stand out and create problems. In a person with celiac disease, the gliadin “beads” are the toxic part of gluten. Celiacs can tolerate a miniscule amount of gluten in their diet, about 10 milligrams. How much is 10 milligrams? Flip over the back of a multivitamin and take a peek at how many milligrams of each vitamin and mineral are packed into that pill or tablet and you’ll see 10 milligrams is next to nothing. Though there are about 400 new gluten free products introduced into the marketplace every year, navigating the maize of avoiding gluten can be a challenge for a number of reasons including cross contamination (French fries cooked in the same oil with anything breaded for example) and food service personnel may not understand how to keep gluten free meals completely separate from regular gluten-containing dishes. Distilled vinegar is gluten free, vinegar that isn’t distilled probably isn’t. Oats are only gluten free if they are processed, handled and packaged in a gluten free facility (otherwise, each step of the way they can be contaminated with gluten). Fasano said Triumph Dining books and apps are very helpful for people who need to navigate gluten-free grocery shopping, cooking and eating out at restaurants.

So, aside from the sheer entertainment value the biggest difference in opinion between Fasano and Guandalini was about grain intake in the normal, non-celiac disease population. Fasano said “modern wheat is a chronic poison,” and “grains are not good for us.” He also mentioned that the Paleo diet is intrinsically gluten free (all Cross Fitters are slapping high fives right about now saying “I knew it!”). Guandalini believes those without celiac disease can easily enjoy their wheat and other grains without a problem. And, he takes his own advice devouring the most delicious Italian bread and gnocchi Chicago has to offer.