Organic Does Not Mean Pesticide Free

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Are you worried about pesticides in your food? This infographic compares organic and conventional foods. Below you will find more information on this topic.

Organic does not mean pesticide free
Organic does not mean pesticide free

Nutrition Differences?

Most research shows there are no major nutrition differences between organic and conventional food (1). So you can feel good knowing you are getting the same amount of vitamins, minerals and fiber in comparable products.

Organic dairy products contain significantly higher protein, ALA, total omega-3 fatty acids than conventional dairy (2). Even though these differences are statistically significant, they don’t make much of an impact on your diet. Both aren’t great sources of ALA compared to walnuts, flaxseeds, chia and hemp.

Labeling Terms:

There are different labeling terms that will tell you more about the ingredients in the food, drink or supplement you are buying (by percent).

500px-USDA_organic_seal.svg

100% organic

– All ingredients must be certified organic
– Any processing aids must be organic
– The label must state the name of the person who certified it
– Must be made without GMOs, sewage sludge, irradiation, synthetic (man-made) fertilizers

95% Organic
– Must contain at least 95% organic ingredients
– Label must state the name of the person who certified it
– All non-organic ingredients are on the National List
– Must be made without GMOs, sewage sludge, irradiation, synthetic (man-made) fertilizers

Organic
– Must contain at least 70% certified organic ingredients (not including salt or water)
– Must be made without GMOs, sewage sludge, irradiation, synthetic (man-made) fertilizers
– All other ingredients are on the National List
– Label must state the name of the person who certified it

Are you a researcher or farmer? USDA spent $113 million to support research and farming of fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, and nursery crops.

References:
1 Am J Clin Nutr 2009;90(3):680-5.
2 J Sci Food Agric 2012;92(14):2774-81.