Should You Go on a Detox from Sugar?

Should You Go on a Detox from Sugar?

Oh my gosh, the TODAY show just launched a new initiative called the 10-day sugar detox (#NoSugarTODAY). I’m so sick of detoxes! Though most people should reduce their intake of added sugars, let’s call a spade a spade: sugar is hardly “toxic”. Before giving a nutrient so much power, let’s get the facts right:

              –  No one single nutrient is responsible for poor health, weight gain, etc.

                –  Diet is a confluence of factors: food, lifestyle (exercise, activities of daily living,  sleep and more), etc.

                  –  Rather than focus on the single nutrient, think *really* hard about what you want to accomplish.

Why Should We Give Up Sugar?

It’s tough to tease out single ingredients like sugar and their potential health effects. However, we are eating too much added sugar – the kind that is mixed in during cooking or food processing. Men are averaging 335 calories from added sugars (20 teaspoons) whereas women are taking in an average of 239 calories (15 teaspoons) from added sugar each day. Kids are consuming a whooping 16% of their calories from added sugars.[1] The majority of added sugar in our diet comes from our food (as opposed to beverages). And while some of the sources are things you might expect: sodas, desserts, nutrition bars, etc., some of the added sugar culprits are seemingly healthy foods such as salad dressings and sauces. Added sugar enhances taste and provides calories but has no real nutrition value, in other words, no vitamins, minerals or plant based compounds that are important for good health. Naturally occurring sugars are found in foods packed with good nutrition including fruits, vegetables and dairy products. Though added sugars have nothing to offer you, giving up the sweet stuff for 10 days may be a short-term solution yet ineffective for the long term.

Here’s why the TODAY Show is missing the mark with this 10-day detox:

– 10 days isn’t long enough to change a habit. It’s more like taking a vacation.

– The cold turkey approach rarely works. You’re better off gradually reducing.

– Foods with naturally occurring sugars such as 100% fruit juice and dried fruits are wrongly maligned. In fact, the majority of research shows moderate amounts of 100% fruit juice are not linked to overweight or obesity in adults or children).

– You’re allowed to go right back to your old eating habits after 10 days. So what’s the point?

Why Limit Yourself to 10 Days? Set Yourself Up for a Lifetime of Success

–  Figure out why you are tempted to do a sugar detox and then plan to specifically address that issue.

–  Log your food intake for at least 3 days via MyFitnessPal. See how much sugar   you’re really eating. Can you tell which foods are sugar-added vs. naturally sweet?

–  Find small changes to reduce added sugars. For instance, you may need to cut down on sodas, or swap ice cream for a 100% fruit juice pop, or make your own vinaigrettes (really easy – especially if you take flavored vinegars and combine them with extra virgin olive oil; or try one of these simple, unique recipes)

–  Don’t deprive yourself of foods with naturally-occurring sugars. When I crave something sweet I reach for dried figs (or other fruit), plain yogurt, or sparkling water mixed with 100% fruit juice. All of these give me vitamins, minerals, and healthy plant-based compounds called polyphenols.

–  Reassess your food intake after 1 month and see if you can make any additional improvements).

–  Bottom line: progress is in the small steps, not giant leaps (or in this case, detoxes).

Many Americans should cut down on added sugars and make room for more nutrient-dense foods. But, don’t thrown the baby out with the bathwater and then go on an all-out sugar binge because you feel deprived. Forget the “detox,” figure out your “why” (why would you do a detox? What do you hope to gain?) and then carve out a reasonable plan for change that doesn’t focus on one single dietary variable. After all, there is no one food or ingredient that leads to obesity, chronic disease, feeling like your energy is zapped, or any other health issue.

[1] Ervin RB, Ogden CL. Consumption of added sugars among U.S. adults, 2005– 2010. NCHS data brief, no 122. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2013. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db122.pdf

[2] O’Connor TM, et al. Beverage intake among preschool children and its effect on weight status. Pediatrics. 2006. 118:e1010-e1018.

[3] Field AE, et al. Association between fruit and vegetable intake and change in body mass index among a large sample of children and adolescents in the United States. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2003. 27:821-826.

[4] O’Neil CE, et al. A review of the relationship between 100% fruit juice consumption and weight in children and adolescents. Am J Lifestyle Med. 2008. 2:315-354.

[5] Johnson L, et al. Is sugar-sweetened beverage consumption associated with increased fatness in children? Nutrition. 2007. 23:557-563.

 

Your Cooking Oil is Harming Your Health and Aging You

Bottle of Olive Oil with Wooden Spoon --- Image by © Radius Images/Corbis
Bottle of Olive Oil with Wooden Spoon — Image by © Radius Images/Corbis

If you open a bottle of cooking oil and take months to finish it, heat, light and air start to break down the oil, making it rancid. At best, it smells and tastes different. At worse – potentially toxic compounds are produced in the oil. In this article, I’ll share how to prevent the introduction of these compounds in your oil, on your plate and in your body, how to choose the right oil and store it properly and  also distinguish regular vs. extra virgin olive oil.

Choose the Right Oil for Cooking & Throw Out Your Deep Fat Fryer

For high heat cooking, you need an oil with a high smoke point. When an oil hits it’s smoke point it breaks down and becomes rancid. Rancid oils may smell or taste bad (though sadly some people are accustomed to this taste as “normal”) and may contain toxic compounds, some of which are believe to contribute to cell aging (1, 2, 3). In general, refined oils have a higher smoke point than unrefined oils. Refer to the usage instructions on the bottle to find out if your oil can be used for high heat cooking.

Use Type of Oil Smoke Point (3) Greater likelihood of Oxidation (> 50 PUFA %) (4) 
Baking
Cooking
Stir Frying
Almond
Avocado
Canola
Grapeseed
Hazelnut
Peanut
Olive oil
Palm
Safflower
Sunflower
High Almond
Grapeseed
Hazelnut
Safflower
Sunflower oil
Light sautéing
Sauces
Low-heat baking
Coconut
Corn
Hempseed
Macadamia nut, refined
Sesame, refined
Soybean
Walnut – refrigerate after opening
Medium Corn
Flaxseed
Hempseed
Soybean oil
Walnut
Dressings
Dips
Sauces
*Refrigerate these oils after opening
Flaxseed
Pumpkin seed
Wheat Germ
Low

In addition to using the right oil for the application, throw out your deep fat fryer and quit eating fried foods (or at the very least, toss the oil after each use). Food manufacturers and restaurants re-use oils over and over for frying. After several days they discard the oil and replace it with fresh oil (5). Each time the oil is used it loses some of its integrity and the smoke point lowers. And though it may take several uses before it becomes rancid (depending on the oil used, frying time, heat and other factors), frying decreases the amount of antioxidants in the oil (greater frying time = fewer antioxidants), changes the integrity of the oil and produces trans fatty acids (repeated heating of oil, prolonged heating and heating in an iron container all increase the formation of trans fatty acids) and volatile compounds (such as aldehydes, triacylglycerol oxidation products including alkoxy, epoxy, keto monomeric compounds, and higher molecular weight oxidation products) (6, 7, 8, 9, 10).

Store it Properly

Store your oil in a cool and dry place away from direct sunlight (some oils should be refrigerated – as noted above). When possible, buy oil in dark glass containers. When monounsaturated (MUFA) and polyunsaturated (PUFA) fatty acids in oil react with oxygen they become oxidized and form a variety of chemicals, several of which are toxic (aldehydes, ketones, alkenals). The production of these compounds speeds up when the oil is exposed to heat and light or metals are present. More polyunsaturated fat = greater likelihood of oxidation so check your oil’s PUFA content above and if its high, buy smaller quantities of this oil and smell-check it frequently. If it smells different than when you bought it, toss it in the trash.

What is Extra Virgin Olive Oil vs. Olive Oil?

U.S. Extra Virgin Olive Oil is the oil resulting from the first pressing of olives and is suitable for human consumption without further processing. It has “excellent flavor and odor” (smell).

U.S. Virgin Olive Oil is olive oil (oil obtained by picking and processing olives), or blends of virgin olive oil and refined olive oil. It has “reasonably good flavor and odor.”

U.S. Olive Oil is a blend of refined olive oil and virgin olive oils.

Refined Olive Oil is sold as “Olive oil” or “Pure olive oil” and is the oil obtained from subsequent pressings (after the first pressing) and suitable for human consumption by refining processes which neutralize the acidity or remove particulate. Heating, neutralizing, bleaching and deodorizing may be used (10, 11).

“‘Light’ olive oil refers only to the flavor and is determined by the amount of extra virgin olive oil added to the refined olive oil.” (12)

 

References

1 Totani N, et al. Chemical properties and cytotoxicity of thermally oxidized oil. J Oleo Sci. 2008;57(3):153-60.
2 Penumathsa SV et al. Changes in Activities of MMP in Alcohol and Thermally Oxidized Sunflower Oil-Induced Liver Damage: NAC Antioxidant Therapy.Toxicol Mech Methods 2006;16(5):267-74.
3 Deep Fat Frying and Food Safety. USDA.
4 Halvorsen BL, Blomhoff. Determination of lipid oxidation products in vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements. Food Nutr Res. 2011;55:10.5
5 Onal B, Ergin G. Antioxidative effects of alpha-tocopherol and ascorbyl palmitate on thermal oxidation of canola oil. Nahrung 2002;46(6):420-6.
6 Liu WH et al. Analysis and formation of trans fatty acids in hydrogenated soyabean oil during heating. Food Chem 2007;104(4):1740–1749.
7 Neff WE, et al. Composition of oils extracted from potato chips by supercritical fluid extraction. Eur J Lipid Sci Tech 2002;104(12):785–791.
8 Mirsha R, Sharma HK. Effect of frying conditions on the physico-chemical properties of rice bran oil and its blended oil. J Food Sci Technol 2014;51(6):1076-84.
9 Zhang Q, et al. Chemical alterations taken place during deep-fat frying based on certain reaction products: a review. Chem Phys Lipids 2012;165(6):662-81.
10 Kala AL et al. Effect of heating oils and fats in containers of different materials on their trans fatty acid content. J Sci Food Agric 2012;92(11):2227-33.
10 Guidance for Industry: A Food Labeling Guide (12. Appendix D: Qualified Health Claims). U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
11 United States Standards for Grades of Olive Oil and Olive-Pomace OilEffective October 25, 2010. USDA.
12 Grading Manual for Olive Oil and Olive-Pomace Oil. USDA. Effective May 2012.

 

Are Your Muscles Sore and Joints Hurting? Here’s What You Should be Eating

When I first started cross country in high school I would go to sleep in a homemade pajama of Ben Gay slathered all over my sore legs. And then each morning at 5 am my sister would have to pry me out of bed for our newspaper route. As I threw one sore leg after the other off the bed I absolutely dreaded the thought of running, a necessary task since she made me go to the houses with the dogs that chased us and the sketchy places by the woods (I’m the youngest). If you too have tried Ben Gay, massage, ice packs or any other modality for trying to decrease muscle soreness and keep your joints moving, it’s time to fight exercise-induced inflammation through your diet.

Here’s what I’ll cover in this post (and as shared on Talk of Alabama this morning – see their website for more information):

  • The top two foods you need to decrease muscle soreness
  • Foods that keep your joints healthy

Talk of Alabama

Decreasing Muscle Soreness

When it comes to exercise, some inflammation is good and actually essential for muscle growth and repair. But, excess inflammation can lead to muscle cell damage and that feeling like you couldn’t possibly get off the couch for days. So, I recommend athletes include tart cherry juice into their regular nutrition regimen as a preventative measure. Research shows **tart cherry juice can help decrease exercise-induced muscle soreness and inflammation. Try it in a shake or check out my gelatin chews below.

Research from the University of Georgia found 2 grams of ginger, either fresh ginger or in spice form (they tested McCormick ginger), helps reduce muscle pain when consumed daily for 11 days prior to exercise testing. I have a few recipes below you might want to try. Also, check out Reed’s Ginger Brew (it is like ginger ale but made from real ginger with 17 grams per bottle!).

Keeping Your Joints Moving

Fatty fish including salmon, mackerel, herring, anchovies etc. contain long chain omega-3 fatty acids that have modest anti-inflammatory effects and have been shown to decrease cartilage breakdown (cartilage is like a sponge that cushions your joints so they can easily glide on top of one another) and inflammation in cell culture studies. In addition, research studies show these fatty acids can improve several symptoms associated with *rheumatoid arthritis and possibly even decrease the need for anti-inflammatory drugs. *Always talk to your physician if you have a disease such as rheumatoid arthritis.

Plus, there are two types of plant-based foods you should focus on. Foods rich in vitamin C including citrus, bell peppers, broccoli, strawberries, cauliflower, pineapple, kiwi. Vitamin C is necessary for repairing and maintaining cartilage and higher intakes are associated with less severe cartilage breakdown. In addition to vitamin C, yellow and orange fruits and vegetables contain an antioxidant that may improve bone formation and decrease bone breakdown. And finally, ginger is also effective for reducing joint pain though you have to consume it regularly over several weeks (500 mg ginger extract was used). 

Cherry Ginger Smoothie

Ingredients
8 oz. vanilla soymilk
1 scoop unflavored or vanilla whey protein (if using unflavored you may need to add a sweetener)
½ cup frozen tart cherries
2 tsp. (or more if desired) fresh cut ginger
Ice as desired

Directions
Add vanilla soymilk to blender followed by the rest of the ingredients in order. Blend until smooth.

Honey Ginger Salmon

Ingredients
4 salmon fillets (4-6 oz. each)
2 tsp. finely grated fresh ginger or 1 tsp. ginger spice
3 Tbsp. honey
2 tsp. olive oil
¼ cup soy sauce

Directions
Mix all ingredients except salmon in a bowl. Place marinade and salmon in large resealable plastic bag so that marinade coats salmon fillets. Refrigerate for 30 minutes or longer. Remove salmon fillets and grill 6 to 8 minutes per side or bake at 350°F for 15-20 minutes.

Fig Cherry Ginger Chews

Ingredients
13 dried figs
1/2 cup dried tart cherries
3 tsp finely grated fresh ginger

Directions:
Place all ingredients in a food processor and mix throughly. Take small portions out and make small balls. If you want them even sweeter, roll finished balls in cane sugar or powdered coconut sugar.

Tart Cherry Gelatin

Ingredients
2 packets gelatin mix
2 cups tart cherry juice
3 tsp fresh ginger

Directions
Boil 1.5 cups tart cherry juice. While juice is boiling place remaining 1/2 tart cherry juice in a bowl and mix in gelatin packets. Let sit for at least one minute. When juice is finished boiling mix it into juice & gelatin mixture until throughly blended. Add 3 tsp. fresh grated ginger and 1 – 2 Tbsp. sugar if desired. Place mixture in an 8×8 pan and refrigerate for at least one hour. Remove from refrigerator and enjoy!

** TV segment, but not post, sponsored by the Cherry Marketing Institute

Go Green for Earth Month & Improve Your Diet at the Same Time

You don’t have to run out and hug a tree or play hackie sack while barefoot in the park to celebrate Earth Month. Instead, Earth Day and Month were designed to designed to inspire awareness for our environment. What’s in it for you? A polluted environment leads to pollution in our food and water supply that ends up on our plates and in our bodies. And therefore, a healthier earth means a healthier you. You can do your part by recycling, disposing of hazardous wastes properly (so they don’t end up in the water you drink or on the plants you eat) and changing your diet by incorporating foods that are not only good for you but also use fewer environmental resources to produce and/or are produced in an earth-friendly manner. On a recent segment on WBAL NBC Baltimore MD, I shared the top 3 steps you can take right now to help protect the environment and improve your diet at the same time:

1) Choose green seafood – seafood that’s both good for you and good for the ocean.  The DC-based Environmental Working Group has a guide to seafood that is high in omega-3 fats and low in methylmercury. This is especially important for pregnant women and young children. Growing fetuses are exposed to methylmercury in the womb when their mom eats fish and shellfish that contain methylmercury. Methylmercury can harm a baby’s growing brain and nervous system. Recent government data suggests an estimated 1.4 million women of reproductive age have blood mercury concentrations that may increase the risk of learning disabilities in their unborn children. Exposure to mercury is harmful to all people and may have toxic effects on the nervous, digestive and immune systems, and on lungs, kidneys, skin and eyes. EWG top choices for lower mercury omega-3 rich seafood: wild salmon, sardines, Atlantic mackerel, mussels and rainbow trout.

2 ) Go Meatless. Now, I’m not suggesting everyone go completely meatless (because animal based sources of protein are typically better for building and maintaining muscle) but, adding more plant based proteins or going completely meatless for 1 day a week has the environmental impact of taking your car off the road for 320 miles, according to the Environmental Working Group. How does this help your body? Plant based sources of protein are typically lower in calories yet they are packed with good nutrition including vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber. How can you get enough protein – choose soy, beans, lentils and nuts. I often mix animal-based proteins with plant-based proteins at meals.

3) Cook with canned foods. Americans throw away approximately 15 to 20 percent of the fresh fruits and vegetables they purchase every year. Stock up on canned foods because they help reduce food waste, saving us time and money, and reducing our impact on the environment. Canned food portion sizes are just right for both individuals and families, and most recipes are designed around these sizes. Plus, metal cans are endlessly recyclable and in fact, are the most recycled containers in America today, keeping metal out of landfills and saving significant energy. Looking for convenient, wallet-friendly sources of protein? Check out this resource (and easy recipes) Quality Protein – It’s in the Can – Fact Sheet 

Marie Spano, MS, RD, CSCS, CSSD is a proud Can-bassador – helping educate and communicate the benefits of cooking with canned foods.

 

 

Food Fraud: Low-Quality Food with a Mask

By: Gisselle Marie Rosa, UGA MS student & Dietetic Intern

As consumers, we put our trust in food companies to be honest about their food products. You go to the grocery store and spend and exorbitant amount on 100% pure Italian olive oil expecting that it comes from the finest olive crops in Italy. Yet that dark glass bottle with the scenic picture of an olive farm in Tuscany may contain olive oil mixed with lower quality vegetable oil. Then you see news reports bombarding the media about honey that is diluted with less expensive syrups and “wild” salmon that was actually farm-raised in another continent. It makes you wonder why food companies would risk lying to their consumers about the quality of the food they are selling and how you can avoid buying these products at all.

Food fraud, or economically motivated adulteration, refers to defrauding buyers of food or ingredients for economic gain. There are generally three types of fraud: complete or partial replacement of a food or ingredient, the addition of a substance to mask the quality of the food product, and removal of a component of the food product. Unfortunately, no one really knows exactly how common these practices are. Most instances of food fraud do not pose a public health risk, so they are easy to get away with. There are some instances, however, where certain foods or ingredients are adulterated with potential allergens or toxic ingredients that could harm the consumer. Some examples are as benign as injecting shrimp with gelatin, while others are as dangerous as adding melamine to infant formula to make the protein content of the formula seem higher. The latter example led to thousands of infant illnesses and the death of 6 infants in China.

However, not all cases of food adulteration are intentional. An example is selling bruised fruit, where mishandling could have led to decreased quality of the produce item and potential exposure to contamination.

It is pretty evident that food fraud can be deceiving and even dangerous. So how can you become a more informed consumer?

The U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) has an online database available to the public that provides food ingredient fraud reports. In this database, you can find past reports from the media and scientific journals about food fraud incidents. Additionally, the United States Department of Agriculture has a website that posts the most recent food recalls, many of which are due to food adulteration.

According to the Congressional Research Service, some of the most common food categories with reported cases of food fraud include: olive oil, fish and seafood, milk and milk-based products, honey, fruit juice, coffee and tea, spices, and organic foods. Curious to see how these foods have been adulterated in the past? Check out the http://www.usp.org/food-ingredients/food-fraud-database to see for yourself.

Just remember: a smart consumer is a safe consumer. While there is no need to be skeptical about every food product you buy, it is important to understand that food fraud exists. So the next time you go to the store to buy fresh red snapper, make sure that the fish you are buying is authentic and not a cheaper, lower quality fish.

Resources:

Johnson, R. Food Fraud and “Economically Motivated Adulteration” of Food and Food Ingredients. Congressional Research Service 2014. Internet: https://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R43358.pdf

U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention. USP’s Food Fraud Database 2015. Internet: http://www.usp.org/food-ingredients/food-fraud-database

United States Department of Agriculture. Recalls and Public Health Alerts, 2014. Internet: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/recalls-and-public-health-alerts/

Get off the Dieting Cycle and Lose Weight for Good in 2015

Are you a yo-yo dieter, stuck in a seemingly endless cycle of losing weight and gaining it back again?  If so, you aren’t alone. I’ve met many people who say they are experts at losing weight but they just can’t seem to keep it off. So I’m going to share my top tips for taking the weight off and keeping it off for good – the very same steps I shared with Fox 5 viewers this week. But first, let’s talk about dieting….

All diets have one thing in common – they help you cut calories so you lose weight. And when you lose weight you’ll lose both fat and muscle. However, when you go on a juice fast or low calorie diet that doesn’t contain enough protein (and most don’t), you will lose a considerable amount of muscle tissue. And that’s a huge problem because muscle burns more calories at rest than fat (just a few but it adds up over time) so when you lose muscle you’ll need fewer calories each day just to maintain your weight. Over time, repeated bouts of protein poor diets could decrease your calorie needs even further, making it increasingly difficult to keep the weight off without dieting. And therefore, if you want to go on a diet there are two things you need to do:

  • Feed the Muscle to Keep the Muscle. You’ll need even more protein when you cut your calories to help ensure you are preserving muscle while losing fat. A good rule of thumb, start by consuming at least 25 – 30 grams of protein per meal. At breakfast consider mixing a packet of protein powder in 6 oz. of milk or higher protein soy milk, eggs (2 large egg whites + 2 large eggs = about 28 grams of protein and just 200 calories), plain Greek yogurt + 2 Tbsp. of peanut butter or eat foods that aren’t traditionally associated with breakfast (last night’s leftovers). At lunch and dinner, you’ll need about the serving size of a female’s palm worth of chicken, turkey or fish or mix and match proteins by adding tofu, tempeh, beans, bean pastas, nuts and seeds.
  • Have an exit strategy – a plan for transitioning off your diet. Don’t stay on a very low calorie diet for an extended period of time. You will decrease your metabolism – the amount of calories you need each day. If you are cutting calories for more than just a few months, take a day or two each week and don’t drop your calories – eat what you need to if you wanted to maintain your weight (bump up your calorie intake).

Now let’s focus on fitness. There are two mistakes I see people making over and over – spending hours on cardio machines and sitting around the rest of the day. If you spend some quality time burning calories on the treadmill, bike or other cardio machine, its time to trade in some of your aerobic sessions for resistance training – lifting weights, power yoga, or anything that requires you to exercise a muscle or muscle group against external resistance. As we age we lose muscle. Losing muscle means your body will require fewer calories each day (again, this means you’ll need to eat less over time just to stay at the same body weight). Maintaining muscle will be easier to maintain your weight. If you already lift weights, change your routine to continue to make gains. Incorporate different exercises, lift until failure – until you can’t squeeze out any more reps (you do not necessarily have to use a heavy weight but instead can lift lighter weights using more reps till failure) or try doing compound sets – two or more exercises in a row targeting the same muscle group without rest.

Last but certainly not least, get moving and stay moving. Simply going to the gym isn’t enough to help you maintain your weight or counteract the health hazards of sitting most of the day. Sitting for long periods of time slows blood circulation, increases your risk of developing blood clots, leads to tight muscles and, sedentary behavior is tied to an increased risk of heart disease. So get moving and stay moving all day long. Ignore modern conveniences including escalators, elevators, the drive-through, pay at the gas pump and more. All of these rob you of the chance to move your body, burn calories and improve your health. If you need a little motivation, buy a fitness tracker. I prefer the ones that show you how many steps you’ve walked on the device versus those that require you to log on to your computer or smart phone just to see how active you are.

Lighten Up Over the Holidays: Healthier Holiday Eating

Gisselle Marie Rosa, UGA M.S. student

With the holiday season here, many Americans are faced with a very difficult decision: should I dive into that second serving of glazed ham and mashed potatoes delicately covered with a blanket of gravy or put the rest away for later? At this time of year, family and friends often gather together around the dinner table, sharing comfort food and stories while celebrating the holidays. But, let’s face the facts, many holiday foods aren’t the healthiest options. According to a recently published study, most Americans gain 0.5 kilograms, or about 1 pound, of weight during the holiday season.Overweight and obese individuals gain more than than those who are healthy weight.

But, if it’s only 1 measly pound over the holidays, then what’s the big deal?

While it seems that gaining 1 pound isn’t a big deal, the same study showed that most individuals don’t shed that pound over the next year. So over time those measly pounds tend to add up, increasing the individual’s risk for becoming overweight or obese.

Does this mean that you can’t eat your favorite holiday dishes?

Absolutely not! This is a special time and it is OK to enjoy the foods you love. However, there are some ways that you can modify your favorite dishes to make them more nutritious but still keep the familiar flavor that you love. Here are some tips to lighten up your holiday favorites:

  1. Appetizers/Dipping Sauces
    1. Chips, creamy dips, fried cheese sticks, potato skins, buffalo chicken poppers, you name it. These tasty snacks are one of the biggest calorie-packing culprits during the holidays. If appetizers are on the menu, opt for fresh vegetables dipped in a light ranch sauce or whole wheat pita chips dipped in a low-fat yogurt dip. Plenty of flavor, fewer calories.
  2. Mashed Potatoes
    1. This creamy dish is the quintessential holiday companion to any entrée, but many people make mashed potatoes with cheese, heavy cream, and plenty of butter. Try substituting the heavy cream for skim milk and chicken broth or roasted garlic for extra flavor while keeping the creamy texture of the potatoes.
  3. Latkes
    1. Potato Latkes are an essential part of every Hanukkah celebration, but these fried pillows of potatoes can really add a lot of fat to the holiday meal. Try mixing white and sweet potatoes to add extra vitamins and minerals to your dish. Also, make sure to use healthy oils such as olive oil to sauté the latkes instead of butter!
  4. Vegetable Casseroles
    1. While delicious, these creamy concoctions are typically filled with extra cheese, creamy condensed soups, and overcooked vegetables. Upgrade your favorite vegetable casseroles by substituting canned vegetables with frozen vegetables to decrease the sodium. Additionally, substituting some of the fried onions with slivered almonds keeps the familiar crunch while switching to low-fat cheese cuts out some of the fat and calories (or use less of a more flavorful cheese).
  5. Baked Goods
    1. Dessert during the holidays is definitely a must! A great way to cut the fat and the calories from your favorite baked goods is by substituting the oil with applesauce. Applesauce adds lots of moisture and becomes almost flavorless, making it a versatile ingredient.

Making healthy choices during the holidays may seem like a sacrifice, but it does not have to be! Done right, you can enjoy your favorite holiday comfort foods without packing on the calories or the pounds.

References

Schoeller DA. The effect of holiday weight gain on body weight. Physiology and Behavior 2014;134:66-69.

Electrolytes That Will Help You Stay Hydrated & Perform Better

When athletes focus on their diet, carbohydrates, protein, and fats come to mind. But, what about electrolytes? Electrolytes are minerals that help the body maintain fluid balance, regulate nerve impulse transmissions, and influence muscle contraction and relaxation. Any electrolyte disturbance can potentially hinder athletic performance and may lead to muscle weakness, muscle twitching, dehydration, and cramping.

Sodium chloride is the major electrolyte lost through sweat followed by smaller amounts of potassium, calcium, and magnesium. And therefore, sodium is generally recognized as the primary electrolyte that needs replacing during exercise. Consuming sodium during athletic performance helps to replace the sodium lost through while also helping prevent hyponatremia (a dangerous condition where the amount of sodium in the blood is lower than normal) and maintaining blood volume (this is especially important for athletes with low blood pressure). Sodium losses through sweat can vary tremendously between athletes with reported losses ranging from 0.2 grams of sodium per liter (1 liter = 4.23 cups) of sweat to over 12.5 grams of sodium per liter (12.5 grams of sodium is the amount in 5.4 teaspoons of salt) of sweat. Sweat sodium losses are dependent upon an athlete’s dietary sodium intake, sweat rate, adaptation to heat, and rehydration source (and how much sodium their during exercise beverage contains).

Hydrating with water alone can help prevent over-heating, but will not protect you against electrolyte imbalances. In fact, relying solely on water can dilute blood sodium levels and therefore contribute to hyponatremia. Popular sports drinks typically provide varying amounts of electrolytes though some athletes may need additional sodium to fully replenish sodium lost through sweat.

If you find that you need more sodium, start by adding 50 – 100 mg for every 8 oz. of fluid. So for instance, mix ½ packet Gatorlytes into a 32 oz. bottle of Gatorade or PowerAde (or similar sports drink).

Product Product Description Serving Size Electrolyte Content More Information
Gatorlytes Contains sodium, potassium, magnesium, chloride, and calcium for salty sweaters

Mix in water or other beverages

1 packet (3.4 grams) – Sodium: 780 mg

– Potassium: 400 mg

– Magnesium: 40 mg

-Contains no carbohydrate and is therefore an electrolyte replacement supplement only.

-Good option for those who need more sodium.

The Right Stuff -Electrolyte replacement designed as a pre-exercise hyperhydrator (to expand plasma volume via sodium fluid load)

-Liquid form

-Sweetened with Splenda

20 ml liquid -Sodium: 1,780 mg -NSF Certified for Sport

-Good option for “heavy sweaters” or athletes exercising in hot and humid environments (due to its high sodium content)

-Does not provide potassium, magnesium, and calcium

-The research listed on their website is less than impressive since they have never compared The Right Stuff against another electrolyte product with the same exact amount of sodium. Instead, the Right Stuff has been compared with low and no sodium conditions (the studies were not designed to truly test The Right Stuff but instead make the product look good).

NUUN -Electrolyte tablets

-Comes in 3 drink options: NUUN active hydration, U natural hydration, and NUUN all day hydration

-12 tablets in 1 tube

1 NUUN Active Hydration Tablet

NUUN All Day Hydration

NUUN U Natural Hydration

-Sodium: 360 mg

-Potassium: 100 mg

-Magnesium: 25 mg

-Calcium: 13 mg

– Sodium: 60 mg

– Potassium: 200 mg

– Magnesium: 20 mg

– Calcium: 0 mg

– Sodium: 180 mg

– Potassium: 77 mg

– Magnesium: 20 mg

– Calcium: 0 mg

-NUUN Active Hydration contains sorbitol which is a sugar alcohol that may cause GI (stomach) distress

-NUUN’s U natural hydration uses Stevia instead of sorbitol

-Contains no sugar

Hammer Endurolytes -Electrolyte capsule

-You can swallow the capsules hourly, or open them and mix your own amount into a water bottle

-Contains 50 mg of amino acid glycine to help neutralize the salty taste

2 capsules -Sodium: 80 mg

-Potassium: 50 mg

-Magnesium: 50 mg

-Calcium: 100 mg

-Hammer products are low in sodium.

-Xylitol is a common ingredient in Hammer products, which like all sugar alcohols, has the potential cause GI problems

Skratch -Electrolyte mix that can be added into water

-Has various products including Skratch Exercise Hydration mix

-Contains 80 calories and 20 grams of carbohydrates

1 scoop (20 gm) Lemons and Limes Skratch exercise hydration mix -Sodium: 240 mg

-Potassium: 40 mg

-Magnesium: 24 mg

-Calcium: 10 mg

-1st ingredient is cane sugar

-Uses real fruit rather than artificial flavors or colorings

Klean Electrolytes -Electrolyte replacement in capsule form

-Recommend taking one to three supplements, depending on individual’s sweat rate, weight, and activity duration

1 capsule -Sodium: 40 mg

-Potassium: 25 mg

-Magnesium: 25 mg

-Calcium: 25 mg

-NSF Certified for Sport

-No adverse side effects have been reported

-Relatively low in sodium for an electrolyte supplement

Generation UCAN -UCAN has a sports drink mix, protein-enhanced drink mix, plain superstarch, and hydrate replacement

-UCAN hydrate is an electrolyte replacement

-Powder form

-No sugar and zero calorie

-Lemon lime flavor

-Sweetened with Stevia

1 packet of Generation UCAN Hydrate -Sodium: 300 mg

-Potassium: 100 mg

-Magnesium: 50 mg

-Calcium: 15 mg

– UCAN products contain a low glycemic modified starch

-UCAN hydrate contains no sugar and zero calories

– There is no research to suggest that UCAN is superior to typical sugars used during or after exercise. In fact, higher glycemic carbohydrates are preferable post exercise for replacing glycogen and decreasing muscle breakdown

Infinit Nutrition -Customize your own nutrition supplement

-Designs supplements for different needs

-ISIS Hydration has 220 calories and 55 g carbohydrate from maltodextrin and dextrose

1 packet of ISIS Hydration Ingredients can be customized to meet your needs or you can choose from one of their preset formulations including ISIS hydration which includes:

-Sodium: 325 mg

-Potassium: 94 mg

-Magnesium: 5 mg

-Calcium: 3 mg

-Can customize products flavor, carbohydrate, calories, electrolytes, protein, amino acids, and caffeine

-Or you can shop present formulas

Avoid Packing on the Pounds this Holiday Season

If holiday parties tempt your desire to overindulge in mouth-watering creamy dips, comforting homemade casseroles and delectable desserts, you may find yourself panicking by the end of December and ready to crash diet on January 1st. Instead of doing something stupid (crash dieting), try a more sensible approach to avoid packing on the pounds this holiday season while still enjoying yourself. Follow these 3 tips for keeping calories in check this holiday season:

  1. Think “strategic placement” at holiday parties. While other people may worry about locating themselves near the life of the party, locate yourself away from the chip and dip bowl, especially if a meal will be served. Grab a small plate with a couple of appetizers, then walk away. Chances are you’ll get caught up in a conversation which will prevent the temptation to over-indulge in extra calories. Consider strategic placement strategy when filing your plate as well. Make half of your plate fresh fruits and veggies and the other half those higher calorie items that you can’t wait to dig into.
  1. Make smart swaps to traditional favorites. Admittedly, the holidays aren’t the best time to try an entirely different approach to cherished family menus, but you can make improvements. Try swapping reduce fat dairy for regular dairy, broth based soups instead of creamy versions and lighter versions of other ingredients as well. In addition, try adding grated vegetables (zucchini, carrots and onions often work well) in place of some ground meat in meat-based dishes.
    Not only will this enhance the nutrition value of your dish but it will also improve the flavor.
  1. Don’t drink away all your good efforts. No matter how great your strategy is for choosing healthier foods at the holidays, alcoholic drinks can be your calorie downfall. The best solution: alternate your beverages with a glass of water or club soda. You’ll stay better hydrated, keep calories in check and avoid a hangover. If plain water doesn’t sound very appealing, try sparkling water or club soda with a splash of 100% juice and a twist of lime. This simple strategy will help you reduce your calories and help you stay hydrated thereby preventing a hangover the next day. Also, if you are a wine drinker, take out a liquid measuring cup and measure 4 oz. of wine and pour it into a wine glass so you know what one serving of wine looks like. It is considerably smaller than you may think.